Marketing To The Festival Season aka “Millennial Utopia”

Marketing To The Festival Season aka “Millennial Utopia”

There are hundreds of music festivals that take place year round in the U.S. alone, however the big, multi-day, even multi-weekend festivals SXSW, Ultra, Coachella, EDC, Governor’s Ball, Lollapalooza usually kick off in spring and hit HARD in the summer time. What’s happened with each of these festivals is that they have transformed way beyond music and become a playground for art, fashion, food, technology and social issues. The attendees are more than just concertgoers and see these events as can’t miss experiences they love being a part of.

Of these millions of attendees, half of them are millennials. What do you do when you have a plethora of excited millennials in one place with Internet access? You market to them.

1. Geo-fence Targeting

One of the most effective marketing strategies when it comes to these large-scale events is location targeting. Marketing techniques utilize mobile device location data, lat/long coordinates to pinpoint those in that geographical location at a specific time. Think of Snapchat Geofilters that can only be accessed while you are within the boundaries of set perimeter.

Geo-fencing, is creating a virtual perimeter that triggers specific ads and content including special discounts and offers to attendees and promoting products and events that the audience would mostly likely be interested in. Advertisers are also utilizing this technique to re-market weeks after the event is over.

2. Interactive Experiences

More and more brands offer interactive experiences at festivals and let the attendees do the marketing for them. Some huge brands will showcase cutting edge virtual reality or fun new technologies for attendees to tinker with, but it doesn’t have to be that high end or complex.

Displaying new products that haven’t hit the public yet can be enough to get the buzz going. Even simple things like digital photo booths with props, cool art installations or basic chill zones can generate brand awareness because millenials love sharing these instagrammable moments. Branded booths offering sun relief or a place to charge phones and connect to WiFi are considered a festival oasis. Attendees are coming to you and you can exchange their much-needed relief for a Re-post/Retweet, hashtag share or even a sticker on their festival outfit and call it a deal!

3. Influencer Parties

Depending on your industry, hosting an exclusive party off festival grounds during the day has become priceless for certain brands especially for fashion retailers. Inviting celebrities and ”lifestyle influencers” to attend and share their experience on social media can have a huge ROI, just ask Revolve.

You don’t need an A-list guest list, ask influencers in your specific industry and create relationships. Vloggers and social media micro-influencers are happy to share and engage their followers.

Leverage FOMO4. Leverage FOMO

The fear of missing out is real, especially if it’s experience that everyone is chasing. Even if millenials aren’t at the festival physically, they are there virtually. Utilize that festival theme and plan your content around it. Email blasts, blog posts, playlists, podcasts and shareable social media images can garner you valuable web traffic without even stepping foot inside. Millenials who can’t attend are live streaming, live tweeting and are still a part of the conversation so you should join in too.

5. Experiential Marketing

Want to test something totally out of the box, this is the crowd you want to experiment with. Brands like Soul Cycle offered spin classes to attendees so they can get their workout in before they let loose inside the festival. Asics offered  a pre-festival morning hike and what these lead to were highly shareable moments that really leveraged other aspects of the festival culture.

Millennials are excited to try new things and be a part of something unqiue and the festival environment is all about having fun after all.

Matt Ramage is founder of Emarketed a web marketing agency located in Los Angeles. He loves coffee, good design, and helping businesses improve their look and getting found on the Internet.

When Remarketing Isn’t Right for Your Business

When Remarketing ISN’T RIGHT FOR YOUR BUSINESS

Remarketing is a useful and effective marketing approach for some industries. Part of analyzing your marketing success means recognizing what works and what doesn’t. It’s OK if remarketing doesn’t work for your business and here’s why:

creepy-remarketing

Type of Business

Some business owners are quick to jump on the latest trends without fully understanding what it is and why it works. First off, your industry may be the best indicator to determine if remarketing is a viable option. Let’s just say a criminal or divorce attorney might not want their ads following people around… especially on a work, shared or family computer.

Most people don’t mind ads for things they’re interested in and have previously searched for. But there are some certain industries where ads are lingering reminders don’t make your business look good or trustworthy.

ROI

Remarketing is typically cost effective and easy to implement. But if you’re not keeping track of conversion, effectiveness or ROI, it doesn’t help to run these campaigns. In fact, it’s just an unnecessary cost. Some business owners many complain that they don’t see a noticeable difference with remarketing. This should give you the opportunity to re-optimize your ads or reevaluate the need for running them in the first place.

Better Results with Paid Ads or Email

New advertising options are different but it doesn’t always mean that it will be better. Depending on your business and industry, you might see better results with more traditional online ads like PPC and email campaigns. In many ways, remarketing is like an email campaign. But email is targeted specifically towards one user and more direct and private.

No Time for In-Depth Analysis

This goes along with the ROI concern mentioned above. Remarketing is often set on autopilot but that doesn’t mean you can just forget about it. There’s nothing creepier and annoying than being followed by the same ad anywhere you go. There are also seemingly little things to consider.

As a business, it’s important to diversify the ads that are remarketed. If you don’t have time to analyze your campaigns or even test and use different ads, it could defeat the purpose of using remarketing. Users don’t like to be bombarded with the same ad, so the least you could do is rotate a handful of different ones. This should also help with testing which ones work best.

Find Out If Remarketing Is Right For Your Business

Call Emarketed at (323) 340-4010 for a free consultation and review of whether remarketing can help your business.

Matt Ramage is founder of Emarketed a web marketing agency located in Los Angeles. He loves coffee, good design, and helping businesses improve their look and getting found on the Internet.

Recap of 2011 Google Agency Summit

Here’s the recap of our visit to the Google Agency Summit that we’ve been promising!

We’ll take a quick overview of marketing spending, display ads, mobile ads, and video in terms of small business use. The overall focus throughout the day was on small business (SMB) growth. Makes sense, doesn’t it? The small business segment is a promising category with big opportunities. Here are some key points that we learned:

SMB Spending and Growth

  • Total SMB digital ad spend is growing at 25% YoY (year on year)
  • Growth is happening within Google local services and beyond on platforms like: Facebook, Groupon and LivingSocial
  • According to Google’s (see graph), total US SMB marketing spending is expected to almost double by 2015. This is a self-proclaimed “conservative” forecast, so we could see numbers even higher than that!

Display Ads

With over 2 million sites, Google now has the largest ad network . What does this mean for the potential of display ads? The emphasis here was on the concept of remarketing. Remarketing allows you to target and show ads to users who have already visited your website. This is helpful to help them recall your products and services, something that they’ve obviously been interested in since they have already been to your site. This is an innovative new way to match the right customers to your message.

Mobile Ads and Video

Mobile ads are evolving and should be a different and more helpful experience for mobile users. There is less space on a mobile screen, which means that functions like “Store Locator” take priority over plain old text. People searching on their phone aren’t going to have the time or space to read text. Learn how you can build a basic mobile site with this free Google tool.

As for video, the big push is for small businesses to come on board, given the massive potential and size of YouTube. Small businesses could utilize video marketing by using banners, pre-roll commercials and even encourage user created content. With so much up and coming news, you can always stay updated with Google’s latest ad products here.

Marketing Goals

At the end of the day, it’s clear that Google is trying to make things easier for everyone – small business owners and their customers. This is why Google is so intent on integration and working closely with with agencies like Emarketed… so that we can help our customers!

It looks like there’s a lot in store in the future for small businesses. As a small business owner, it’s important to stay informed so that you don’t get left behind. Here’s a list of some helpful information on topics related to what we just talked about:

Mobile Web Sites
Video Marketing
Website Marketing
Landing Page Optimization

You can also comment, or find us on Facebook or Twitter if you have any questions!

Matt Ramage is founder of Emarketed a web marketing agency located in Los Angeles. He loves coffee, good design, and helping businesses improve their look and getting found on the Internet.