Measuring My Social Media Marketing ROI

Measuring My Social Media Marketing ROI

More businesses are spending a significant portion of their marketing budget on social media. Social media marketing is crucial but at times it can be difficult to tell how successful a particular campaign has been. How can you gauge the performance of a specific social media strategy so that you know it was worth the effort?

To measure social media marketing ROI there are many different kinds of metrics that you can look at. You can measure fans, followers, retweets and shares or even referral traffic from other platforms. In order to measure the ROI for a particular campaign though, you will need to identify the specific goals you have and determine your key performance indicators that will measure those goals.

For example if your goal is increasing engagement then you might focus on measuring likes, comments and shares. If your goal is sales then you would track your conversion rate based on actual purchases. There are tools to help track changes in any of these numbers such as Google analytics which helps you monitor particular actions from visitors including conversion.

It can also be useful to measure your social media efforts in comparison with competitors to see how you are succeeding. You can start to look for ways to stand out against others in your industry so that your social media efforts are more effective in the future. Doing something different or unique compared to other brands can help you get better results with social media marketing.

As long as you know what your goals are for a particular campaign you can narrow down the type of data you need to gather in order to measure your ROI. If you consistently work to improve your ROI you will start to see your social media campaigns experience more success over time.

 

Matt Ramage is founder of Emarketed a web marketing agency located in Los Angeles. He loves coffee, good design, and helping businesses improve their look and getting found on the Internet.

Mark Zuckerberg Matchmaker Takes On The Dating Industry

Mark Zuckerberg, The Matchmaker

This week Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced a new dating feature that would be added to Facebook’s mobile app called Facebook Dating that some have deemed “FaceDate.” Although Facebook is the largest social network in the world, in terms of fostering relationships the only feature available since its inception is the infamous Relationship Status box that allows users to share if they are single, in a relationship or “its complicated”.

In the keynote, Zuckerberg stated that 1 in 3 marriages start online, meaning this venture has been overlooked for a decade. Zuckerberg said since their focus is to help people find meaningful relationships, a life partner would be the most meaningful of all.

Adding the dating mode feature makes Facebook a huge competitor in the dating app world. This feature could then be a strategic move to attract a younger demo and regain those that made up Facebook majority but has now left for other social media platforms. Facebook Dating

Of course these features are optional and users will have to opt in to see other users dating profiles.. Facebook events can be unlocked by both users allow them to connect to people attending local events or connect with people in similar groups. “FaceDate” would provide the most relevant matches based on mutual friends and other data that other platforms simply cant provide.

Tons of people find their significant other on Facebook anyway, this feature may just make it easier. Facebook said there will be more information about the new Dating features in the next few months including a release date and testing phase.

Matt Ramage is founder of Emarketed a web marketing agency located in Los Angeles. He loves coffee, good design, and helping businesses improve their look and getting found on the Internet.

Should I Boost My Facebook Post?

Should I Boost My Facebook Post?

A basic Facebook post might be able to get a certain number of views organically but businesses that want more people to view important posts might be interested in other options. Facebook offers the “boost post” option as a way to get a particular post seen by more users if you pay a fee. Boosting a post is a quick and easy way to get a Facebook post to show up in more people’s newsfeed and increase the likelihood that they will respond and gain an interest in you.

One of the reasons that boosting a Facebook post can be helpful is if you are not reaching the particular audience that you want to reach or you simply aren’t getting enough views. Normal posts can often only reach a small percentage of your audience and businesses with an advertising budget might find boosting them more effective. Boosting can be a bit limiting however, compared to other advertising options but it can provide a quick solution if you want a particular post to be seen.

Boosting a post does not include some of the more nuanced options that are available with normal Facebook ad features. With boosting you can’t customize or target a certain audience if you want the post to be seen by particular people. Although it will bring a particular post in front of a wider audience, you can’t necessarily specify certain demographics.

For businesses that want their post to receive more likes, shares and comments or simply more views overall then boosting the post may be a good option. For more advanced types of advertising it will be a better choice to create a Facebook ad so that you can target certain groups to see the post. Boosting can be helpful for a quick increase in interaction on your page.

Matt Ramage is founder of Emarketed a web marketing agency located in Los Angeles. He loves coffee, good design, and helping businesses improve their look and getting found on the Internet.

Are Groups The New Pages For Facebook?

This January, Mark Zuckerberg dropped a bombshell for marketers on his Facebook page:

“[W]e’ve gotten feedback from our community that public content — posts from businesses, brands and media — is crowding out the personal moments that lead us to connect more with each other…” As a result, the company is “making a major change to how we build Facebook,” starting with the “News Feed, where you can expect to see more from your friends, family and groups.”

For most marketers, these changes weren’t necessarily a surprise. Facebook’s been doing this for years, slowly weeding out content from public pages in favor of posts from family and friends. What was notable about this announcement, however, was Facebook’s advocacy for groups, in addition to the usual suspects of family and friends.

The inclusion of groups got marketers thinking… are groups the new pages for Facebook?

Can you rely on Facebook Groups?

Even if you’re already eagerly visualizing your brand’s big debut into Facebook groups, you’re probably feeling at least a hint of trepidation along with your excitement. You’ve been beaten down over the years, with each algorithm bringing a new blow to your organic reach on Facebook. It only makes sense that you’d be wary about doubling-down on groups only for Facebook to change its tune later on.

While nothing can be guaranteed in the ever-changing social media landscape, there are some clear signs that you can trust Facebook’s making a serious investment in groups and they’re here to stay (at least for a little while).

Although it feels new, Facebook’s focus on groups has actually been brewing for a little while. In mid-2017, Facebook held its first Communities Summit for Group Admins in Chicago.

What precipitated this event? According to Zuckerberg, “We recently found that more than 100 million people on Facebook are members of what we call ‘very meaningful’ groups. These are groups that upon joining, quickly become the most important part of our social network experience and an important part of our physical support structure. For example, many new parents tell us that joining a parenting group after having a child fits this purpose.”

Then, this February, Facebook followed up with a Communities Summit in Europe that hosted over 300 group “power admins.” At the event, Facebook announced many of the initiatives they’ve launched based on feedback from the first summit, and continued gathering important feedback and ideas from the elite group for future releases.

What can you do with Facebook Groups?

If you haven’t paid attention to Facebook Groups in a while, you can do a lot more with them than you may realize. Facebook’s made strides to nurture engagement in groups and offer admins more advanced management tools on par with what you see with brand pages.

Engagement features

Last October, Facebook introduced two new features that enhance and personalize the community experience of groups.

  1. Welcome posts invite group admins to tag new members by name:Welcome Posts
  2. Clicking on a member’s name heavily emphasizes their group activity, along with the normal things they have in common with the person who clicked (as opposed to the default search on Facebook, which shows the common interests alone):Members Name

Changes like these make group members feel closer than a random stranger on Facebook, inviting more engagement.

Facebook knows that both groups and their Facebook Live video feature boast spectacularly high engagement rates – so they decided to combine the two with their new Watch Party feature. Group admins can choose a public Facebook video for their group to watch at the same time. It’s like simultaneously watching a video together and commenting on it with your friends.Facebook Live

Admin tools

The first sign a social platform is starting to care about a demographic is when you see it adding analytics features that rival the ones they offer to paying advertisers. You’ve seen this most recently with Snapchat’s recent concessions for influencers. Facebook’s new suite of tools for group admins is more sophisticated than ever, and significantly streamlines group management.

Group admins can now easily manage everything from a central administrative dashboard, including viewing insights and approving new member requests. Up to 10 group announcements can be pinned to the top of the page. Group rules, similar to what you find on Reddit, now have a dedicated section.Group Insights

Facebook also recently expanded their Group Insights tool to include “helpful personalized tips, like scheduling posts at times when members are most engaged.” If that sounds a lot like the insights available to Page owners, it’s because it is.Helpful TipsOther, small changes reveal Facebook’s recognition of the importance of group identity when it comes to engagement. For example, admins can now personalize their group pages by selecting a color scheme. This feature isn’t even available to regular profiles!Scholar Scheme

Developing your brand’s strategy for Facebook groups

If you want to have any organic reach on Facebook as a brand, groups are the way to go. Here’s how to go about it the right way.

Posting in groups

It’s no coincidence that Facebook’s groups now share many similarities with Reddit. Group admins have a lot more power. Custom color schemes put the group’s identity first, before Facebook’s own blue branding.

As such, brands should expect group members to treat their Facebook groups with the same fierce loyalty and protection you see on Reddit.

In order to succeed with groups, it is absolutely essential that brands tread lightly. Engage first before promoting (if you promote at all), and always engage authentically. If you don’t, you won’t just risk low engagement. You’ll risk very public ridicule and shaming.

Brands can post in groups as a Page. This maintains your professionalism, but it also keeps your brand faceless. To add humanity to your brand, consider leveraging the personal brands of your employees. They can work in tandem with your Page account to share official announcements, answer FAQ, and participate in discussions related to your industry.

Creating your own branded groups

You can also create your own branded Facebook group via linked Groups. These help your fans stay connected to your company through Page-branded groups featured on your profile.Branded Groups

Plenty of branded Facebook groups have enjoyed success on Facebook, but there are just as many half-hearted efforts that failed. To make your branded group one of the former, consider the following three things before you create your group.

  1. Set your goals.

Is it sales? Then you’ll want a small group for prospects that’s highly cultivated by your sales reps who answer questions and make them feel like VIPs.

Maybe you have a team of brand ambassadors, and your email newsletter isn’t proving effective. A group just for them might work.

If you want a larger public group with the potential to grow, focus on a topic related to your industry. This will be about engagement, driving brand visibility and demonstrating thought leadership – not pushing your products. But, your efforts will result in higher group engagement, improved brand perception, and indirect boosts to your customer retention and sales.

  1. Define your audience.

Depending on the topic and size of your audience, it may make sense to have several groups for different goals. For example, if you’re trying to enter a new vertical, establishing your thought leadership through a branded Facebook group is a great choice.

If your brand speaks to multiple verticals, or widely variant types of users, consider creating multiple groups. The more personal and niche you can be, the better.

  1. Plan your logistics.

Assign the team members who will be responsible for managing the group and fostering engagement. Set up the rules. Develop a content calendar like you do for all your other channels.

For your group to succeed, you need to have a plan and keep it alive. Especially in the beginning, as the onus will be on you to make it worthwhile for fans to stick around.

Using group features

If you decide a branded group is right for you, leverage the tools at your disposal. Personalize your group with a color scheme, and make it friendly with Welcome Posts. Keep it lively with regular Group Announcements. Make the rules of engagement clear with Group Rules, and enforce them so it stays a safe space.

Group Insights provide many of the same insights you rely on to optimize your engagement on your brand Page. Use them to:

  • Discover the best times to post for optimal engagement.
  • Attract more members. Fully complete your profile to increase your chances of showing up in people’s searches for related keywords.
  • Understand your audience better – both for the tone and content of your posts in the group itself, as well as broader market research applications.
  • Find new potential groups to join. Recognize demographic interests among your most engaged users. Similar people might be interested in hearing from you but just haven’t heard of you quite yet. Search for groups related to those interests.
  • Analyze your popular posts to give members more of what they like. Coordinate Watch Parties around topics your fans care about. Share exclusive content for group members..

Facebook groups: the path to meaningful interactions

In an increasingly pay-to-play social media landscape, Facebook Groups offer your brand the opportunity to interact with fans organically. Just make sure those interactions are meaningful.

Michael Quoc is the founder / CEO of Dealspotr, where brands, shoppers, and influencers can connect on the first social platform centered around today’s best promo codes. Previously, he was the Director of Product Management at Yahoo’s media lab, where he led the launch of several innovative services in the live video / mobile social networking areas. Michael has been awarded nine patents relating to mobile and social network applications and technology. Tweet him at @michaelquoc.

Matt Ramage is founder of Emarketed a web marketing agency located in Los Angeles. He loves coffee, good design, and helping businesses improve their look and getting found on the Internet.

The Increasing Worth of a Facebook Fan

In 2010, the average worth of a Facebook fan was valued to be at $136.38, according to a study by Syncapse. This week, the company released another study which revealed that the average Fan is worth $174… and that price is climbing!

Spending and Making Money
The study also shows that in 2012, Facebook made about $5.089 billion in revenue, which comes out to about $5.32 per user. That revenue is coming from businesses, who are finding it to be increasingly profitable to their business and brand to invest in engagement through Facebook.

Study Overview
Brands included in this year’s study were: BMW, Xbox, Disney, Victoria’s Secret, McDonald’s, Starbucks, Walmart and more. So just how do you measure the worth of a Fan? There are different factors that were accounted for including: product spending, loyalty, propensity to recommend, media value, acquisition cost and brand affinity.

Here are some findings:

– Fans are 80% more likely than non-Fans to be “brand users”
– Fans spend more than non-Fans. 43% to be exact, even though they may not necessarily have a higher income.

– Fans are 18% more satisfied with their brands than are non-Fan users.
– Fans 11% more likely to continue using the brands than are non-Fan users.
– On average, 85% of Facebook Fans are likely to recommend the brand compared to 60% of non-Fans.

With social media marketing become more important and ROI becoming more transparent, it’s crucial for small business to make the most of their online campaigns.

Read more by downloading the study here. And continue the conversation by joining us on Facebook!

Matt Ramage is founder of Emarketed a web marketing agency located in Los Angeles. He loves coffee, good design, and helping businesses improve their look and getting found on the Internet.