Google AdWords Editor Update

Google is at it again with another update for the Google AdWords Editor. I look forward to testing this out. First page bid estimates for your keywords is now used in this version while the minimum cost-per-click (CPC) bids are no longer used. The quality score is now displayed for your keywords. You can also now change the language and location for the Keyword Opportunities tool within the Google AdWords Editor. There are some other updates but these are the biggest.

Here’s a quick recap for you newbies out there that aren’t sure what I’m talking about. This tool allows you to manage your Google AdWords account offline through a software interface. If your managing 100 words or less than this tool might not be for you. It’s really geared for larger campaigns and is idea for search marketing companies or consultants that manage multiple accounts. Some of the more tedious work such as updating your ads online can be done fairly quicking with the editor. All you need to do is download the software and install. It will ask you for your user and password and then it will download your AdWords account info so that you can start editing. Your changes are pushed through to your account when you save your data.

Matt Ramage is founder of Emarketed a web marketing agency located in Los Angeles. He loves coffee, good design, and helping businesses improve their look and getting found on the Internet.

What is Search Engine Marketing?

Search Engine Marketing (commonly abbreviated as SEM) is the term used to encompass all the elements involved in using search engines as tools for online marketing. The more often heard abbreviation, SEO, stands for Search Engine Optimization, which is a very effective tool used in online marketing. Coming in a close second in terms of effectiveness is Paid Search.

Both tools attempt to allow a particular website to be “found” easily by the most popular search engines, and rank highly in the search results. It stands to reason that when a prospect is searching for something your company sells, they aren’t going to look through dozens (or perhaps even hundreds) of pages of results. The most desirable place to be is at, or near, the top position in any given set of search results. That way, your prospect sees your website’s address above any number of competitors in the listings.

Search Engine Optimization attempts to accomplish this task “organically,” by manipulating the content of your site so search engines find it highly relevant in relation to specific search terms or keywords. Paid Search attempts to accomplish the same goal by paying for the privilege of being rated as highly relevant. With most search engines, the “sponsored” results (which is just a nicer way of saying “paid for”) are displayed most prominently, appearing above or alongside the main search results. How this is accomplished will be explained in a later chapter.

For now, it’s enough to know these three things:

Search Engine Marketing is a term for all the tools that allow a website to be found more effectively by search engines.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is usually the least expensive way of enabling a website to achieve higher rankings in search results, but it takes time.

Paid Search is the quickest and easiest way to become highly ranked by search engines, although it can be expensive.

Matt Ramage is founder of Emarketed a web marketing agency located in Los Angeles. He loves coffee, good design, and helping businesses improve their look and getting found on the Internet.